Tag Archives: social media

Techtiquette

Can you spot the social media faux pas? (Illustration: Kyle T. Webster)

Let’s face it. Technology has become an indispensable part of our everyday life. The thought of losing our smartphone creates instant panic, forgetting it at home brings on deprivation symptoms and it is hard to imagine how life would be without the internet. Well, at least for most of us.

And yes, we’re still learning and adjusting to this new reality that has radically changed our society and the way we think and act, but there are rules. They may be unwritten, but they exist. We’ve all witnessed improper techtiquette and gotten annoyed by it.

My personal pet peeves are people who talk very loudly on their phones in public spaces, or who play games/listen to music on their  device without using headphones…

But what about social media and party techtiquette? What happens when Facebook, Twitter and Instagram crash your party? What rules do you live by, and wish others lived by?

Here are a couple of tips from the Wall Street Journal:

1. Don’t clutter up serving areas with smartphones.

2. Avoid capturing bad behavior and tagging the person on Facebook.

3. No elbows on or Skyping at the table!

4. Stack smartphones on the table to force everyone to participate in dinner conversation.

5. Send signals—or scold—to discourage loud phone conversations if you’re the host.

6. Designate a party hashtag to help keep track of party tweets and photos on Instagram.

7. Suggest that guests leave phones in a basket by the door.

8. Ask before creating a public listing of a private residence on Foursquare.

Any more to suggest?

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The Hello Cube: where art meets social media

The Hello Cube is an inspired project where art meets social media, bringing a whole new dimension to the word engagement. The cube-shaped installation, displayed at Tate Modern in London, changes color and pattern seemingly without rhyme or reason. However, strangely enough, the cube is being controlled by people all over the world.

The cube  draws upon the ever-expanding power of social media to create art, responding to twitter commands sent to @thehellocube by any twitter user. Users can tweet what they would like to see on the cube, such as “purple” and the cube will change accordingly, thus allowing them to participate in the artistic process.

The Hello Cube, designed as a part of Infinite Kusama, is an art event created by TateCollective, ReCreativeUK.com and the Louis Vuitton Young Arts Project.

Can’t wait to see it when I visit London this September!